DON'T CALL ME PRECIOUS

Short List
TitleDON'T CALL ME PRECIOUS
ClientNIKE
Product / ServiceNIKE CHINA CHILDREN'S DAY CAMPAIGN
EntrantR/GA SHANGHAI, CHINA
Idea Creation R/GA SHANGHAI, CHINA
Production PLAYFULL Shanghai, CHINA

The Campaign

"Don't Call Me Precious is a campaign developed to help Nike China change the ingrained perceptions of children as being too fragile for sport. In the “Don’t Call Me Precious” film, the children focus on their beloved sport event, like basketball, running, football, boxing. They express their true thoughts through their words -- The boy who encounters a strong enemy in the basketball game says: “You (the parents) can’t help me in the game, unless I fight for myself.” The girl who stops running because she reaches out her limit says: “It’s okay, you are not the first one who look down upon me.” Eventually, they find their potential in the athletic field, and feel the challenge and fun in the sports. The potential of the athlete that those children have are always misjudged or limited because of the “precious” stereotype of them. "

Creative Execution

"This work includes a series of films, a meme generator, DOOH and events. It hero's four real-life junior sport stars and showcases their mental toughness, athleticism and outspoken demand to not be babied. Timed to coincide Children's Day on June 1st, it delivered a short, sharp shock with saccharine sentimentality. Chinese kids and their parents have very different media behaviors and they live on different platforms. To reach both of them effectively, Nike used a combination of kid and parent channels with customized content and engagements. 5 films, a series of KVs, and an HTML5 meme activation were created to make the campaign integrated, engaging and socially impactful. Nike used top social media platforms WeChat, Weibo, and Qzone to get both parents and children involved. Influencers shared their H5 posters on Weibo to amplify the impact. Two OTV sites Youku and IQIYI are targeting both kids and parents. "

"Total impressions: 209M Total views: 71M Kids physically activated: 7500+ Breakdown: Targeted OTV Total Views: 71M Outdoor Media OOH impressions: 28.2M Nike Weibo Views of the video: 633k (post on 5.21) Views of the video: 80k (post on 5.24) Views of the video: 80k (post on 5.28) Views of the video: 80k (post on 5.30) Views of the video: 980k (post on 6.1) (Source: Nike Weibo) Nike Wechat video post: 2 times/4 articles (pushed on 5.31/6.1) Reach: 4,525,092 Readership: 238,308 Share: 2,564 (Source: Nike) Qzone H5 performance: Total impression: 134M Total clicks: 4.9M Total engagements: 1.8M "

Experiences were developed in both online and offline platforms. Chinese kids and their parents have very different media behaviors, Nike used specific channels to target kids and parents with customized content and engagements. Films on digital media and social helped spread the story online whilst KVs featured across OOH and retail in offline helped keep the messaging consistent. Online was further supported by using top social media platforms to get both parents and children involved. These posts linked to various offline events created for parents and kids such as a kids marathon and basketball camps throughout the children's day weekend.

"Our targeted kids are born in the age of China’s “One Child Policy”. Through in-depth interviews and social listening, we dig out a prevalent, unique yet unspoken tension point in China between parents and kids - Chinese parents tend to be overprotective and hold double standards on their only child doing sports. Nike believes that sports shouldn’t be limited by age - Children also have the grit, determination and fearlessness of adults. The potential in children and the love and focus that they have in sports can all prove that they are real athletes. We picked Children's Day when everyone is celebrating kids being naive and sweet. Nike cut through the crowds and breaks the sterotype by showing kids talking tough, having their own opinions, and that they are much braver than what people expect. "

Credits

Name Company Position
Terence Leong R/GA Shanghai Executive Creative Director
Cook Xu R/GA Shanghai Associate Creative Director
Timothy Cheng R/GA Shanghai Associate Creative Director
Ashley Chin R/GA Shanghai Associate Creative Director
Yimeng Bai R/GA Shanghai Associate Creative Director
Kaori Lo R/GA Shanghai Senior Art Director
Martha Ma R/GA Shanghai Visual Designer
Richard Zhou R/GA Shanghai Account Director
Lexi Wang R/GA Shanghai Account Manager
Barry Peng R/GA Shanghai Senior Producer
Ann Yao R/GA Shanghai Associate Producer
Hon Foong R/GA Shanghai Content Producer
Laurent Thevenet R/GA Shanghai Senior Technology Director
Dragon Chiang R/GA Shanghai Software Engineer
Links
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